Tag Archives: crime fiction

Whiner.

32. The Bachman Books: Road Work – Richard Bachman

When I first read this book I felt very little sympathy for the main character. He seemed like a controlling jerk who can’t cope with change and decides to take it out on everyone else. I still think that’s a big part of who the main character is; he seems to be angry in part because he can’t control how things are changing and has acted like a complete entitled ass about some of it. However, as one ages, one has the possibility of understanding how people get to this point more easily. I imagine if he was a lady he wouldn’t have made the same decisions because he would’ve had more of an idea how stacked against you society can be and maybe not been so extreme in his reactions so as not to “cause a scene.” Of course, then there’s no book. “Woman calmly endures negative change despite many things working against her” is just how things are. Ew.

Danger Crumples faces the future while Ozymandias tries to hide under a stuffed turtle.

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There are an awful lot of stakes raised here for a book that didn’t involve many vampires.

65. Wolfman Confidential – Justin Robinson

Things are getting a lot darker in the City of Devils. It would stand to reason that any story involving more of the mobster and cop elements of the adventures of Nick Moss would be on the more serious side – even if those mobsters are a sidhe, the girl version of Krang from Ninja Turtles, and a germaphobe.

At first I was a little nervous about the amount of new characters that continued to pop up and have things resolved throughout the novel. That nerviness turned out to be unfounded by the end, thankfully, as the characters circled back around or their involvement in the main plot became clear. It’s so important in a series with a world as unusual and detailed as this one to not just mention some new person or location or thing solely for its own sake and Robinson manages to keep the newness and revealed relevance fun throughout. There are a lot of weird and wonderful set pieces with a ghost gang’s lair, goblins, a phantom and his young protégé, and – unexpectedly – people.

I have to say, though, my favorite scene involved the familiar monsters who hang out at Nick’s house every night trying to get him to let them turn him. Nick basically giving story-time to Sam, Mira, and Lurkimer made for a good moment of grounding in a very action packed story.

Ozma is waiting for Pere to tell her stories about her own version of the Night War.

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The blurb says “Dark and droll” and that’s about right.

73. Raylan – Elmore Leonard

Timothy Olyphant’s influence on the Raylan character is definitely at play in the first Raylan-focused novel published after Justified hit the screen. It’s fair – Olyphant’s Raylan is exactly who I want to picture as Raylan Givens. When reading Raylan, it’s interesting to see the differences in how Leonard deals with his characters after the show, including those who barely got much time on Justified (like Jackie Nevada), and how he deals with the changes in the timeline. It’s a good thing Justified was such a damn good show – would’ve been hard to live up to Elmore Leonard’s legacy otherwise. The saga of Dewey Crowe-take on the kidney theft storyline from this book is one of my favorite things Justified has done. Dewey fucking Crowe.

Reading about Raylan Givens is like Horace settling in to his willow bridge with a nice, comfy blanket and a friendly squirrel to lie on – comfortable, enjoyable, worth it.

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“Lying causes cat piss smell.”

36. Riding the Rap – Elmore Leonard

A Deadwood movie has been green lit! Yay! Don’t suddenly back out! I started this year quite ill, the result of a long situation with some two inch thick ice and my trusty meat cleaver… and while I was ill I finally finished watching all of Deadwood. I’ve mentioned how much I love Justified on here before, so, basically I needed to catch up on the earlier incarnation of Timothy Olyphant, lawman. And since HBO DVDs do that evil thing where they force you to click on each episode individually and then each episode has its own menu and you have to click again in order to watch each episode and I have to have a continuous stream of something on my TV in order to sleep, I switched to Justified when I needed to pass out. So, lots of Timothy Olyphant, lawman, lots, all of it great. I do prefer Raylan to Seth Bullock, but it’s mostly because Raylan says a lot more…thanks to Elmore Leonard’s gifted dialogue. I’m hoping that in the Deadwood movie Seth says a lot more. I mean, I love Al and he did need to say the most, but, maybe Seth could say some more things while he’s grimly setting that jaw? A few more? I like hearing him talk.

The plot of Riding the Rap was adapted for Justified, and Raylan doesn’t quite have the major role that I wanted him to have in the book. The criminals in this story are definitely some serious hoopleheads, as usual, including but almost excluding Reverend Dawn, and it has all the Elmore Leonard hallmarks that make his crime novels worth reading, again I mention dialogue – it’s really important to me and he is truly the best -, so it’s good.

Boyd and Raylan, Swearengen and Bullock, Ozymandias and Danger Crumples.

Boyd and Raylan, Swearengen and Bullock, Ozymandias and Danger Crumples.

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